Linux Mint 11 LXDE review

Graphical Administrative Applications: The installed graphical administrative applications are accessible from Menu > System Tools and Menu > Preferences. They are all standard, graphical administrative application that you will find on other Linux Mint editions. However, one that is conspicuous by its absence is the screen resolution or display (switcher) tool. This is the first Linux distribution that I have reviewed or used that does not have one installed out of the box. This is not really a big deal, but an application like that should be installed by default, especially given the fact that there are three in the repository.

Physical and Network Security Posture: Linux Mint 11 LXDE does not have a good physical security posture. And that is because the installer does not support disk encryption and boot loader password protection, two features used to enhance the physical security posture of a system.

On the network security side, just one port, port 631 (for printing), is open by default, and it only accessible locally. Gufw, one of 3 graphical interfaces for managing ufw, the command line frontend for IPTables, is installed but not configured. Shown below is the main interface of Gufw, with the rule addition window inset.
Gufw on Linux Mint 11

Final Thoughts: If you do not care too much about guarding access to your data with disk encryption, this edition of Linux Mint is a decent distribution to use. Some of the desktop settings applications are not as feature-rich as their GNOME or KDE equivalents, but they work.

Resources: There is no 64-bit installation images for Linux Mint 11 LXDE, but the 32-bit image may be downloaded from here, and you may read the release notes here. Support questions may be posted here and on Questions and Answers.

Screenshots: More screenshots from test installations of Linux Mint 11 LXDE.

Installed and available Featured applications in the Software Manager.
Software Manager's Features Apps on Linux Mint 11 LXDE

Gnumeric and Abiword, are the only office applications installed by default.
Linux Mint 11 LXDE Desktop Menu

System administration tools in the Administration menu category.
System Tools on Linux Mint 11 LXDE

Software entries in the Preferences menu category.
Preferences on Linux Mint 11 LXDE

Related Posts

Ubuntu 11.10 review Ubuntu Desktop 11.10, code-named Oneiric Ocelot, is the latest stable release of Ubuntu, a Linux distribution whose development is sponsored by Canoni...
How to dual-boot Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon/MATE and Windows 7 Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon and Linux Mint 13 MATE are the latest editions of the popular Linux desktop distribution based on Ubuntu Desktop. This tutorial...
How to install Moovida media center on Linux Mint 8 Moovida is a free media center application available for users of Linux and BSD desktop operating systems. It is developed by Fluendo S.A., an outfit ...
Pear Linux 6 review Pear Linux 6, code-named Bartlett, is the latest release of Pear Linux, or Pear OS, a desktop distribution based on Ubuntu Desktop. Unlike its parent ...
ROSA Desktop 2012 beta review ROSA Desktop is a Linux distribution derived from Mandriva Desktop and developed by ROSA, a technology outfit based in Moscow, The Russian Federation....
Manual disk partitioning guide for Linux Mint 11 This article provides a step-by-step guide on how to create partitions on Linux Mint 11, the latest stable release of Linux Mint. And because it encom...

We Recommend These Vendors

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).


  1. Certain gui panel apps like “CPU scaling monitor” and “System Monitor” I find extremely useful in gnome; though which seem dysfunctional in lxde. Will these things ever improve? Are there any other option? Also, I had great difficulty moving panel apps to specific locations on the panel. I found this aesthetically bothersome.

    Aside from that, I was very impressed with my trial of lxde, and would love to use it full time – but for a few minor flaws.

    • Don’t expect things to work in LXDE and Xfce the way they do on, say, KDE and GNOME. Some aspects of LXDE and Xfce are still behind the curve.

  2. Pingback: Links 24/8/2011: Fedora 16 Alpha, South Korean Government Wants Own Free/Libre OS | Techrights

  3. There is one thing I miss in all your reviews I read up to now: Is it possible to use 2 monitors in extended desktop mode?

    • I see no reason you shouldn’t. But thanks for bringing it up. I’ll incorporate that aspect into future reviews.

    • This works fine on multiple monitors (up to 5). The grandr application is very helpful for that.

      Having hopped through at least 10 distros — I have found this one (Linux Mint LXDE) to have an excellent balance of lightness, stability, and adequate included features.
      Debian LXDE was extremely disappointing – packed with out-of-date software, and no GUIs for managing either network connections or Asian languages.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *