Pardus 2011.1 review

Final Thoughts: Pardus is one of the better designed desktop distributions that has been reviewed on this website. I could be using it on a computer I employ for serious stuff if only I could encrypt the disk during installation. For me, that is usually a show-stopper. If you do not care about disk encryption (the Electronic Frontier Foundation thinks you should, and I agree), and you are looking to distro-hop, give this distribution a try. It is not perfect, but with each release, it is getting better, a lot better than some very popular distributions.

To close this section, here is a short list of features I would be delighted to see on Pardus 2011.2:

  • Disk encryption support in YALI
  • Option to password-protect GRUB in YALI
  • Binary XBMC package in the repository
  • An advanced parental control system similar to the one on Mandriva
  • At least one network security system activated by default other than the firewall

Resources: Release notes and download links for 32- and 64-bit ISO Live DVD and installation DVD images for Pardus 2011.1 are available here. Support questions may be posted here (Turkish) and at Questions & Answers.

Screenshots: More screenshots from test installations of Pardus 2011.1

Pardus 2011.1 desktop while using Lancelot’s search feature.
Pardus 2011.1 Dama Dama Desktop

The Lancelot menu configured to show subcategories in popups. It is an experimental features, but it seems to work quite well.
Lancelot Menu on Pardus Desktop 2011.1 Dama Dama

Desktop showing the Network Manager applet.
Network Manager on Pardus 2011.1 Dama Dama

Default games installed on Pardus 2011.1 as seen from the KDE Plasma Netbook interface.
Games on Pardus 2011.1 Dama Dama

KDE Plasma Netbook interface showing installed Internet applications.
Internet Apps on Pardus 2011.1 Dama Dama

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13 Comments

  1. I love the Lancelot menu as well and use it in my Mint KDE desktop. However, it is not the default for Mint, it has the same problem there that you mention here, so it must be a Lancelot bug.
    It won’t display newly installed programs in the menu unless you reboot. Usually can run the program right away without reboot when doing a search for the program (in the menu) but it isn’t where it should be. Odd thing.

  2. Pardus is very nice distribution.
    I tried it couple of times and was very happy both times.
    Though, the difference is that I do Live system reviews…

    http://linuxblog.darkduck.com/2011/07/pardus-20111-turkish-delight.html

  3. Most information of Pardus in general you get from the official homepage/forum:
    http://www.ozgurlukicin.com/
    With the e-magazine etc..

    But it’s Turkish of course (but some indication you get with Google Translate).

    The developers are not so much involved in the unofficial Pardus World Forum in English.

  4. Thanks for Your fair and honest testreport. I agree on the most things You mentioned. As the other comments stated there are some more additional repos also including xmbc. Encryption of the system is a planned feature for Pardus 2012.

    Keep up the good work – I really like those detailed reviews!
    *Thumbsup*

  5. For me the real show stopper is the for ever empty repos. With every release all the software becomes incompatible with the new number. You can’t use 2009, 2010 repos on 2011 so you have to start again and again to fill up the thing.

    • The repository have been Pardus largest problem always as “MacLone” write. But the repo in version 2011.1 are okay. But in 2011 it was to small.
      Pardus have some interesting projects going on.
      Like the Comar Project:

      http://cekirdek.pardus.org.tr/~gokmen/Comar.pdf

      So they probably will solve this problem. If not I guess the users would get tired and change distribution.

    • To keep software actual it is mostly necessary to build regulary a new package. Sometimes libraries changes and then also a package needs some “handwork”. So a necessary package update for a new Pardus version is not a huge disadvantage. It rather helps to keep the system free from errors.

      Everybody is jelling about the small numbers of packages. IMHO Linux is not a gaming system so for me the low number of included games is not a hard thing. Pardus will NEVER have the number of packages as Debian/Ubuntu or the other main distros. BUT – Pardus offers the best main programs everybody needs. Meanwhile we have a really good status. If there is a package missing in repository You can request it in the official bugtracking, or You can contact any volunteer packager.
      For me it is better to keep the repo small and provide only the best working programs than offer every little xxxxx software.

      What packages/programs do You missing in Pardus 2011? I´m very interested, because I have the feeling a lot of people only counting the available packages and then they drop pardus because of the low number.

      Please don´t misunderstand me – my post is not offense or will blame anybody! :o)

    • To keep software actual it is mostly necessary to build regulary a new package. Sometimes libraries changes and then also a package needs some “handwork”. So a necessary package update for a new Pardus version is not a huge disadvantage. It rather helps to keep the system free from errors.

      Everybody is jelling about the small numbers of packages. IMHO Linux is not a gaming system so for me the low number of included games is not a hard thing. Pardus will NEVER have the number of packages as Debian/Ubuntu or the other main distros. BUT – Pardus offers the best main programs everybody needs. Meanwhile we have a really good status. If there is a package missing in repository You can request it in the official bugtracking, or You can contact any volunteer packager.
      For me it is better to keep the repo small and provide only the best working programs than offer every little xxxxx software.

      What packages/programs do You missing in Pardus 2011? I´m very interested, because I have the feeling a lot of people only counting the available packages and then they drop pardus because of the low number.

      Please don´t misunderstand me – my post is not offense or will blame anybody! :o)

      Cheers

      ——

  6. There are a few third-party repo’s available for Pardus, which can be found with the help of the Pardus World Forum and this thread – http://worldforum.pardus-linux.nl/index.php?topic=3478.0

    These sites can also be found via the Pardus-wiki.

  7. I agree with most of the things in this review. But there is actually a community repo to install. That included Google Chrome, Google Earth and some other great applications etc:

    http://www.pardususer.de/index.php?action=repository

    From the German Pardus page. Thanks for a nice review.

  8. XBMC is available on P2011 repo that is an unofficial repo of Pardus-Linux.Org for Pardus 2011.x users.

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