Kali Linux 2 KDE desktop

Kali Linux 2 is the latest edition of Kali Linux, a desktop distribution designed for penetration testers and experienced security users.

By default, it uses a GNOME 3 desktop, but it’s possible to build a custom image using other popular desktop environments, like KDE, Xfce, and MATE. This tutorial will show you how to build a custom image with a KDE desktop.

Because KDE Plasma 5 is not yet available for this distribution, the desktop image you build will be powered by KDE 4.14.2. And it’s a lot easier to build the image from a running Kali Linux 2 desktop. So if you don’t have a Kali Linux 2 installation already, you may install one by downloading an installation image for your platform from here.

The computer I used for building the image has an Intel Core i3 processor inside, so it’s a powerful system. But even at that, the system froze on my first attempt. And that was because I had the IceWeasel Web browser and one other application running. To avoid the same issue, be sure to close all other running applications. Let the terminal be the only application that’s running, unless you have a system that’s more powerful than mine.

Step 1Update Kali Linux 2:
You’ll be using a shell terminal throughout, so launch a shell terminal, update the package database and upgrade the system using the following pair of commands:

# Uncommented lines are commands you must run
# 1. Update the package database

apt-get update

# 2. Apply available updates

apt-get upgrade

#
#

Step 2Install Required Packages:
You only need to install three extra packages that you need for the build. The packages are cdebootstrap, live-build, and live-image-kde-desktop. Install them using the following command:

# Uncommented line is command you must run
# Update the package database

apt-get install cdebootstrap live-build live-image-kde-desktop

#
#

Step 3Build Kali Linux 2 KDE Image:
Use these three commands to clone the repository and starting the build.

# Uncommented lines are commands you must run
# 1. Clone the repository

git clone git://git.kali.org/live-build-config.git

# 2. Change into the new directory

cd live-build-config

# 3. Build the image

./build.sh --distribution sana --variant kde --verbose

#
#

If the build is successful, you should have an ISO image of about 3.1 GB in size in the images directory, which you may then burn to a blank DVD or transfer to a USB stick. The screenshot below shows the KDE desktop installed from the built image.

Kali Linux 2 KDE desktop
Kali Linux 2 KDE desktop

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Hola! Did you notice that LinuxBSDos.com no longer runs network ads?  Yep, no more ads from the usual suspects that track you across the Internet.  But since  I still need to pay to keep the site running, feel free to make a small donation by PayPal.

Subscribe for updates. Trust me, no spam!

Mailchimp Signup Form

Sponsored links

1. Attend Algorithm Conference, a top AI and ML event for 2020.
2. Reasons to use control panel for your server.
3. DHgate Computers Electronics, Cell Phones & more.

2 Responses

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get the latest

On social media
Via my newsletter
Mailchimp Signup Form

Sponsored links

1. Attend Algorithm Conference, a top AI and ML event for 2020.
2. Reasons to use control panel for your server.
3. DHgate Computers Electronics, Cell Phones & more.
Hacking, pentesting distributions

Linux Distributions for Hacking

Experts use these Linux distributions for hacking, digital forensics, and pentesting.

Categories
Archives

The authors of these books are confirmed to speak during

Algorithm Conference

T-minus AI

Author was the first chairperson of AI for the U.S. Air Force.

The case for killer robots

Author is the Director of the Center for Natural and Artificial Intelligence.

Why greatness cannot be planned

Author works on AI safety as a Senior Research Scientist at Uber AI Labs.

Anastasia Marchenkova

An invitation from Anastasia Marchenkova

Hya, after stints as a quantum researcher at Georgia Tech Quantum Optics & Quantum Telecom Lab, and the University of Maryland Joint Quantum Institute, I’m now working on superconducting qubit quantum processors at Bleximo. I’ll be speaking during Algorithm Conference in Austin, Texas, July 16 – 18, 2020. Meet me there and let’s chat about progress and hype in quantum computing.