Ubiquity, Ubuntu Desktop‘s graphical installation program, is very easy to use, very newbie friendly, but it lacks support for full disk encryption, LVM, the Linux Logical Volume Manager, and RAID. On a desktop system, I do not care very much about RAID, but full disk encryption and LVM are must-haves.

Well, it looks like from Ubuntu 12.10, due in late October, Ubiquity will have support for full disk encryption and LVM. The test build that I installed in a virtual machine shows that the implementation is still in the early stages, but it also shows how easy it will be to configure both features when the final release hits the digital shelves.

The following screen shots show the options in the installer and the default configuration. The test system already had the alpha version of Ubuntu 12.10 on it, so if you choose the first option, LVM and disk encryption are not available.
LVM and Encrypt

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They are only available if you opt to erase the disk and install Ubuntu standalone.
LVM and Encryption

When LVM is selected, the system creates three partitions by default: A primary partition (sda1) mounted at /boot of about 228 MB in size; an extended partition initialized for use by LVM (this is the Physical Volume), with two logical volumes created under it. The logical volumes are for root and Swap. So unlike the default setup in Fedora, there is no separate logical volume for /home.
LVM  Partitions

If the LVM and disk encryption options are both selected, you will have to specify a security key or passphrase that will be used to encrypt and decrypt the disk. Currently, the installer does not check the strength of the security key, even allowing you to set a 1-character security key. That is obviously not good, but I expect that to be rectified before the final version is released.
Disks Encryption Passphrase

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With disk encryption configured, you get this screen on each reboot.
Encryption Passphrase

And this just shows the disk layout as seen from the disk management utility. Selecting LVM and disk encryption creates an encrypted LVM volume, because the Physical Volume is encrypted. Note that LVM and disk encryption have not been implemented in the Advanced Partitioning Tool. But that, too, should be in place by late October.
Encrypted LVM

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8 Responses

  1. i am using UEFI too but after installed success then restart i have to choose OS while booting my laptop,do u have idea how to make it automatically to windows OS?

  2. I did all of the above but my grub never shows up, but instead my bios just starts up and goes black in a constant cycle. Is there something I can do to remediate this situation?

  3. Thanks for this tutorial, dual booting windows 10 and Ubuntu 16.10 on my Laptop. Thanks for this great tip and tutorial.

    1. Nope, not even a little.

      In a dual boot setup, only one OS is running at a time, so the OS that’s not running does not impact the one that’s running.

  4. “After the installer starts, click through the first few steps until you get to the one shown in Figure 1. ”

    Easier said than done. It’s asking me about third-party drivers. I don’t know whether I need to check the box (and wrestle with secure-boot again). My EUFI setup doesn’t allow me to disable secure boot, so it might be impossible to proceed. Google is no help (yet) to tell me the consequences of this checkbox choice. Any pointers?

    1. “Third-party drivers” typically deal with wireless and graphics cards, so it’s OK to check that box. Yes, go ahead and check it, but I’m not sure if that will make any difference with Secure Boot still enabled.

      On not being able to disable Secure Boot, what brand of computer do you have? And what happens when you attempt to disable it?

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