ufw-Frontends on Sabayon Linux 6 GNOME

ufw, the Uncomplicated FireWall, is Ubuntu’s user-friendly, command line frontend to IPTables, the command line utility for managing Netfilter, the firewall application built into the Linux kernel. It is installed not just on Ubuntu, but also on all Ubuntu-based distributions. As simple to use as ufw is, a graphical interface is even better, especially for new users.

This article, presents the three graphical interfaces for and managing ufw that I am aware of. If you know another that is not listed here, tell us about it. Note that this is not a tutorial on how to configure them, just a listing.

So, here they are, in alphabetical order:

  1. Gufw – This is the graphical client available on Ubuntu and Ubuntu-based distributions.This is Gufw’s interface in its enabled state.
    gufw1

    The Simple tab allows you to create rules with a port number defined. This makes it possible to create rules for services and applications not preset in the Preconfigured tab.
    gufw5

    The Advanced tab makes it possible to create more specific rules using source and destinations ports and addresses. If you are looking for a guide on how to configure Gufw, how to configure a graphical firewall client on Ubuntu 10.10 is a good one.
    gufw6

  2. KDE Control Module-ufw – This is the K Desktop Environment’s firewall control module and it is typically installed on non-Ubuntu, (KDE) distributions.

    The main window. The tooltip shows the outgoing policy options.
    KDE Firewall Control Module

    And this is the same window showing the logging levels.
    KDE Firewall Module on Chakra

    The default rule adding window presents an interface for adding very general rules. It is the simple rule adding interface.
    KDE Firewall Module on Chakra Linux

    This is advanced window for adding rules. It makes it easy to add more specific rules. Stay tuned for a step-by-step guide on how to configure this graphical interface to ufw.
    KDE Firewall Module on Chakra Linux Aida

  3. ufw-Frontends – This is a PyGTK and PyQt interface to ufw. It is written and maintained by Darwin Bautista and it is the graphical firewall client installed on Sabayon 6 GNOME. This screenshot is the main window.
    ufw-Frontends on Sabayon 6 GNOME

    There is no simple or advanced rule adding window on ufw-Frontends, just a rule adding window. It provides all the options needed to add general or very specific rules. Stay tuned for a step-by-step guide on how to configure this graphical interface to ufw.
    ufw-Frontends on Sabayon Linux 6 GNOME

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11 Responses

  1. Nice little writeup, but I agree with the other folks. This is MAC,not an application-level “firewall” (quotes or not). Check Wikipedia’s impression of what a firewall is.

    Also, way too close to name collision with an application-layer firewall. (And that’s what I thought I would be reading about when I visited here.)

    1. Since you mentioned Wikipedia, here’s a nice little quote from a Wikipedia page on “Application Firewall” (under “Host-based application firewalls”):

      Because of these limitations, application firewalls are beginning to be supplanted by a new generation of application firewalls that rely on mandatory access control (MAC), also referred to as sandboxing, to protect vulnerable services. Examples of next generation host-based application firewalls which control system service calls by an application are AppArmor[3] and the TrustedBSD MAC framework (sandboxing) in Mac OS X.

      From the same article, comes this line: “The application firewall is typically built to control all network traffic on any OSI layer up to the application layer.”

      It’s a very nice article. You may read the whole thing here.

    1. These are not firewalls in the traditional sense, but they work at the application level in very much the same manner that packet filtering firewalls work. They are better known as Mandatory Access Control applications.

      Firestarter or GUFW are just frontends for IPTables/Netfilter, a real packet filtering firewall.

  2. This isn’t really a “firewall” any more than /bin/login and file permissions are. This is really more about access control on the box, i. e. once you’re already on there. That said, mandatory access control (MAC) certainly can help guard against certain types of attacks. Haven’t gotten around to AppArmor yet due to my environment, but I can confirm the general benefits from my experience with SELinux. Once I learned how to work it, I stopped turning it off and started tuning it to my systems.

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