Google’s Chromecast and the new Nexus 7

A new day brings two new hardware from Google. I am referring to the Chromecast and a refreshed Nexus 7 Android tablet computer.

Chromecast is Google’s entry into a field where major and minor technology companies have been throwing their hat in to. It’s a USB flash drive-sized device you plug into any high-definition (HD) TV. Once the wireless connection has been configured, you may then stream or cast online content from any device to the HDTV via the Chromecast.

The ability to stream or cast is platform-agnostic and the device is just US $35.00. The Chromecast is not an original idea, but are their any original ideas left in this arena. Cynically, the question is, how many backdoors are there in this thing? Anyway, backdoored or not, the device is available for sale online here and at Amazon.com. It will be available at BestBuy stores from July 28 (2013).
ChromeCast Google HDTV Android 4.3

The second hardware is not exactly new, but a refreshed version of the Nexus 7 tablet computer. It is said to feature “the sharpest 7” tablet screen ever.” And it is the first tablet computer to ship with the latest Android OS – Android 4.3. The Nexus 7 will be available in the US from July 30, where the starting price tag will be US $229.00.

Here’s some more of the official description:

Nexus 7 now features stereo speakers and virtual surround sound from Fraunhofer (the inventors of the MP3 format), giving you rich and immersive audio. Android 4.3—a sweeter Jelly Bean Nexus 7 is the first device to ship with Android 4.3, the newest version of Android. Tablets are perfect for sharing with others, so in Android 4.3, we’re introducing restricted profiles, which let you limit access to apps and content. For example, restricted profiles enable parental controls, so certain family members are prevented from accessing mature content.

Nexus 7 Android tablet Google Android 4.3

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