Arkose Sandboxing

The stable version of Ubuntu 11.10, code-named Oneiric Ocelot, will be released sometime in late October, but the first beta has just been released on September 1 2011.

If you would like to take it for a spin, you may download it from here. This article just presents a few screenshots to showcase some of the new aspects of the desktop.

In line with recent releases, Oneiric Ocelot does not look like it will come with any new features in the installation program and installation process. The installer in this beta release is the same as the one in the last stable release, Ubuntu 11.04.

The first screenshot is of the login screen. It sports a new look, with access to the guest account smack on it.
Ubuntu 11.10 Beta Login

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This is the default desktop view. Nothing really new here, except access to printers from the profile menu.
Ubunutu 11.10 beta 1 Desktop

This view is the one I think needs a design rethink. With the current implementation, clicking on any of the top icons, confines the search to applications or files within the chosen category. I think it would be better if the icons here are category icons that when clicked, show all the installed applications within the chosen category.
Ubuntu 11.10 Beta 1 Menu

The Software Center seems to be the application that has received the most significant face lift. Aside from the spiffy and bright graphics, the main view offers ready access to the latest and top-rated applications. The left panel features an alphabetical listing of application categories.
Ubuntu 11.10 Beta 1 Software Center

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Even in single-category view, you can see the top-rated applications from the category in focus.
Ubuntu 11.10 Beta 1 Software Center

And in application installation view, you can choose what additional packages, as in the case of a Web browser, for example, that you would like installed.
Ubuntu Software Center App List

The history tab offers detailed historical information on just about any software-related operation performed on the system. It’s now on par with that of Synaptic Package Manager.
Ubuntu Software Center History Log

I wanted to test Arkose, a sandboxing application, but the proprietary applications I tried to run did not work. This is my second attempt. The first time, it was the Arkose-gui that did not work. I will just have to keep trying. By the time the stable version is released, I think Arkose will work.
Arkose Sandboxing

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12 Responses

    1. If your reason for not using a Linux distribution is because it is funded by a “corrupt” Russian dude with money to spare, then good luck to you. The article you linked to, btw, is …. – never mind.

  1. I try to find distro like this witch will be fast and light for old PCs… so is it good one for that???????

    is it better than lubuntu??????????

      1. Thank you for the review, but can you please elaborate a bit on this? In what ways is it much better than Lubuntu apart from the brilliant minimal applications approach and the Rosa theme? Its resource (esp. cpu) usage etc?

        1. in fact I try it on my old laptop with 512 ram, it was faster than lubuntu and more stable.. good supporting for hardware… but hard to find what you want from application to install… I can not stay with it more than 1 day.

  2. I tried this one a few days ago and it was pretty good until I realized that there was no battery meter. Of course there are ways to do this yourself in LXDE but for something that’s aimed at notebooks and lower spec systems I don’t see how they could have overlooked this.

    On the upside, that omission led me to discovering Voyager XFCE which is now installed on my laptop and is my current favorite distro.

  3. Thanks for the review.
    Looks polished as usual for ROSA, and LXDE really needs a team like that that chooses the components well, avoid bugs and gives it some extra polish.
    I didn’t try it myself (satisfied with my Fedora Xfce).
    Just a little warning: when the beta was released, I posted a question in their blog if it would be possible to boot the iso from the HD. It wasn’t answered (no problem, maybe asking in the forum would be wiser) but I got a lot of spam in Russian in the email I entered there.

  4. I’m usually a fan of the bells and whistles type desktops but after the amount of problems I’ve been having with Gnome and KDE lately I might just give this a go.

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