mintdebi17

Linux Mint
Linux Mint Debian is the latest version of Linux Mint. Unlike other versions of Mint, it is not based on Ubuntu, but rather on Debian Testing, and comes with a brand new installer. Also, unlike the Ubuntu-based versions, the installer does not have an automatic disk partitioning feature – it requires manual disk partitioning with GParted.

This tutorial provides a detailed guide on how to partition a single disk for installing Linux Mint Debian, and begins at the step where the disk is detected. The three step prior to this, representing the language selection, timezone settings, and keyboard layout selection have been omitted.

All images used here were taken from an installation in a virtual environment, and is intended to mimic installation on a computer with a single disk with no other operating system on it.

The image below represents the first step in the disk partitioning process. The light-green empty space where the cursor is represents the disk space. There are no existing partition on the disk. To create partitions, click on the Edit partitions button.

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Select the disk to partition

The disk partitioning tool is GParted. Since this disk is a new disk, it has not been initialized, that is, it has no partition table or disk label. You will recognize an uninitialized disk by the presence of a warning or alert symbol as shown in the image below. You will have to initialize the disk before you can create partitions. To do so, click on Device > Create Partition Table…

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If the disk you are trying to install to already has existing partitions, this step will not be necessary.

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QParted

You will get this friendly warning. Click Apply.

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Initialize disk (create a partition table)

With the disk initialized, time to create partitions. Notice that the alert sign has disappeared. Click on the New icon to create the first partition, or double-click on the free space and select New. For this tutorial, I am going to create four partitions for the following file system directories:

  • /boot
  • swap space
  • /, the root file system
  • /home
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Initialized disk ready for partitioning

The first partition to create will be used for /boot. Note that at this step, you are only creating partitions. The mount points will be assigned after you exit GParted. So it is important to know what you are going to use the partition for since that will help you determine the amount of disk space to allocate to it. For the partition that will be used for /boot, 500 MB is recommended, and as the first partition, we are going to create it as a primary partition. The Label field is just to help you remember what this partition is for. You may leave it empty. Click Add when you are done.

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Create partition for /boot

With the first partition created, select the unallocated space and click to create the next one. Note: This step will have to be repeated for all other partitions you want to create.

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Select free space

This partition will be used for swap space. A size of 2 GB will do. For File system, make sure to select linux-swap. You may choose to create it as a primary or extended partition. Add.

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Create swap space

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6 Responses

  1. hello sir , i have successfully installed linux mint 14 on my laptop alongwith windows 8(already installed and working). i referred to your article given above and installed GRUB on separate space,i.e not replacing window’s MBR. after succefull installation it restarted and boot into windows 8. there, as given in article, i used program EASYBCD and added an entry for GRUB in windows boot menu. i selected grub2 as a type of grub. what other things i did there are, i selected linux mint as my default os, and also gave it first preference by using ‘up’ key, and shifting mint upper in position than windows 8(actually i don’t know what it really does, and also suspect this step for all problems that later appeared).now when i started the system, i first got option to select my os, but both choices were: linux mint 14(cinnamon) and whatever i select, i get following error:
    GRUB4DOS 0.4.5b 2011-11-27, Mem:625k/2929M/0M,End:35560D
    [Minimal BASH-like line editing is supported for the first word, TAB lists possible command completions. Anywhere else TAB lists the possible completions of a device/filename]
    grub> _

    and then underscore keeps blinking. i don’t know where the problem has occured but i suspect either the grub has replaced MBR or the system couldn’t find any one of GRUB or MBR. please help me . have found a lot of posts on above type of error but all of them have different causes. waiting for your reply. and thanks in advance.

  2. AS said, while your motherboard is UEFI capable, you are not using it and this tutorial has absolutely nothing to do with anything UEFI. The fact there is no primary partition limit and no logicals on GPT, should have been a major clue.

  3. This (like your other tutorials) is really just dual booting on UEFI hardware, not UEFI dual booting. You’re booting the machine in BIOS emulation mode which your mobo likely defaults to (it must have the other option), so you don’t have GPT, you don’t use the UEFI boot manager, and you’re not showing how the automated and manual install process works. I know Ubiquity, Anaconda, Yast and debian-installer can set up a proper UEFI boot, and the Arch install scripts allow for various UEFI only setups, including the ability to boot the kernel directly, without a bootloader. You should look into exploring those options, it’s gonna be more of a advanced type of tutorial, but much more interesting.

      1. Great article, my problem with it is…after reading as much as I can find about this, I turned off secure boot in the BIOS. Turned off fast boot and that seems to be everyone’s answer. With the “boot mode” in the BIOS set at uefi, the boot able disc is never found. Everyone tries changing the boot mode to cms. I did this and can boot from the disc. The problem arrives after installing in this boot mode, you cannot get back into win 8. How did you boot from a live disc, with the BIOS set in uefi?

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