No, that “Most Trusted Company for Privacy Award” does not compute

I think most people read about the “Most Trusted Internet Company for Privacy Award” via a blog post from the Mozilla Foundation, publisher of the Firefox Web browser. The title of the blog post is “Mozilla Recognized as Most Trusted Internet Company for Privacy.”

It’s important to note that the keyword term here is “Internet Company,” because the study is published as the “Most Trusted Company for Privacy Award.” The company that took home the overall honor is American Express. Mozilla ranked 20 overall, but ranked at the top of the Internet & Social Media subgroup.

The thing that caught my attention as I read the report (pdf), is that Verizon and Microsoft also made the Top 20. Verizon was actually number 1 in the Communications subgroup. I think that’s interesting because a key finding of the study revealed that “the number one privacy-related concern expressed by 61 percent of respondents is identity, closely followed by an increase in government surveillance (56 percent).”

How can people be very concerned about government surveillance, and still trust a company like Microsoft? What are all those backdoors in their products for? And if people are concerned about government surveillance, what about surveillance by private organizations? Has anybody looked into backdoors in Verizon’s Internet routers?

I think the research participants were (are) clueless and I’m willing to bet that readers of this blog or any other tech-related blog will not consider Verizon and Microsoft as trustworthy.

The institute did acknowledge in the report that:

… the ratings may not reflect at all the actual privacy practices of the company and its efforts to protect the personal information of its customers and employees. Further, what a company does in the area of privacy and data protection can be invisible to the consumer until he or she experiences a problem and seeks redress or has a question about the organization’s privacy and data protection practices that needs to be answered.

Ponemon Institute LLC is an independent research institute based in Traverse City, Michigan USA. The study is an annual tradition.

Related Posts

DigitalOcean announces MEAN, a 1-click app installer DigitalOcean has released MEAN, a one-click application installer for some application frameworks. DigitalOcean is a new-breed Cloud hosting provid...
Hooks Hijacked? New Research Shows How To Block Stealthy Malware Attacks The spread of malicious software, also known as malware or computer viruses, is a growing problem that can lead to crashed computer systems, stolen pe...
New System Makes Household Communication Networks More Versatile Household network communications is developing so quickly that it is necessary to adapt and change in order to take advantage of the new services and ...
Digital Science Studio and the HTTP code: 500, type: error Digital Science Studio (DSS) "is a software platform that aggregates all the steps and big data tools necessary to get from raw data to production rea...
Software Freedom on Mobile Devices From Bradley M. Kuhn: I agree pretty completely with Harald Welte's comments regarding Symbian. I encourage everyone to take a look at his comments. ...
Test KDE Frameworks 5/Plasma Workspaces 2 using Project Neon 5 ISO If you are using a Linux desktop computer that's running the KDE desktop, it's likely that you are running a KDE 4.11 series, either version 4.11.2 or...

We Recommend These Vendors

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).


  1. I didn’t trust the Pokemon Institute anyway..

  2. Pingback: Links 30/1/2013: Android Market Share at 70% | Techrights

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *