Openweather GNOME Shell extension

For reasons that I’ll reserve for another article, the GNOME desktop environment is my least favorite, and one that I haven’t used for more than a few hours in years.

And when I used to use it, installing shell extensions to make the desktop look and function like a desktop took much of my time. Installing extensions, at that time, was via https://extensions.gnome.org.

Now that has changed, because extensions now have packages that can be installed using the package manager. Not sure if that’s true on other distributions, but that’s how it is now on Fedora, where dnf, the distributions package manager, can be used to install shell extensions, besides being able to do so using the traditional sources.

A search for gnome-shell-extensions on an installation of Fedora 25 returned the following:

# Searching for gnome-shell-extensions on Fedora 25

gnome-shell-extension-iok.noarch : A gnome-shell extension for iok application
gnome-shell-extension-calc.noarch : A simple calculator in the search overview
gnome-shell-extension-common.noarch : Files common to GNOME Shell Extensions
gnome-shell-extension-fedmsg.noarch : A gnome-shell extension for enabling fedmsg desktop notifications
gnome-shell-extension-pidgin.x86_64 : The components necessary to integrate Pidgin with GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-gpaste.noarch : GNOME Shell extension for GPaste
gnome-shell-extension-pomodoro.i686 : A time management utility for GNOME
gnome-shell-extension-pomodoro.x86_64 : A time management utility for GNOME
gnome-shell-extension-apps-menu.noarch : Application menu for GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-panel-osd.noarch : Configure the place where notifications are shown
gnome-shell-extension-user-theme.noarch : Support for custom themes in GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-drive-menu.noarch : Drive status menu for GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-places-menu.noarch : Places status menu for GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-window-list.noarch : Display a window list at the bottom of the screen in GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-openweather.noarch : Display weather information from many locations in the world
gnome-shell-extension-simple-dock.noarch : Simple Dock for the Gnome Shell desktop
gnome-shell-extension-alternate-tab.noarch : Classic Alt+Tab behavior for GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-background-logo.noarch : Background logo extension for GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-windowsNavigator.noarch : Support for keyboard selection of windows and workspaces in
                                              : GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-auto-move-windows.noarch : Assign specific workspaces to applications in GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-remove-volume-icon.noarch : A gnome-shell extension for removing the volume icon
gnome-shell-extension-launch-new-instance.noarch : Always launch a new application instance for GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-workspace-indicator.noarch : Workspace indicator for GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-remove-bluetooth-icon.noarch : A gnome-shell extension for removing the bluetooth icon
gnome-shell-extension-native-window-placement.noarch : Native window placement for GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-screenshot-window-sizer.noarch : Screenshot window sizer for GNOME Shell
gnome-shell-extension-sustmi-windowoverlay-icons.noarch : Viewing the app icons over the window in the
                                                        : windows overview
gnome-shell-extension-sustmi-historymanager-prefix-search.noarch : Use PageUp and PageDown to move in the
                                                                 : log according the prefix
#

Except for gnome-shell-extension-openweather and a couple more, I think I’ve used most of those returned in the search results. I thought gnome-shell-extension-openweather would be interesting, so I installed it using the following command:

# Installing gnome-shell-extension-openweather on Fedora 25

sudo dnf install gnome-shell-extension-openweather

#

When installed using the package manager it is said that one needs to log out and then log back in to load the extension. However, that didn’t work for me. The installation is in a virtual environment, but that shouldn’t matter. Each login attempt saw me back at the login screen. I had to restart the VM before I could log in again.

Related Post:  How to enable btrfs on Fedora 14

So take note: After installing gnome-shell-extension-openweather, you need to restart the machine before you can log in and start using the extension. If you experience a different behavior, post a comment.

Related Post:  Getting started with Flatpak

Here’s a screenshot of the Fedora 25 desktop showing the extension on the topbar. No, I’m not in Vaiaku, Tuvalu. That’s just the default location of the extension.

OpenWeather GNOME Shell extension
Figure 1: OpenWeather GNOME Shell extension on Fedora 25 GNOME 3

Here’s another showing three additional locations. No, thankfully I’m not in Moscow, Russia, either.

Openweather GNOME Shell extension
Figure 2: Openweather GNOME Shell extension with multiple locations on Fedora 25 GNOME 3

Note that before the extension will appear on the topbar, you first have to turn it on from the GNOME Tweak Tool.

GNOME Tweak Tool
Figure 3: GNOME Tweak Tool on Fedora 25

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15 Responses

    1. FedUp tool was introduced since Fedora 18 to upgrade your system, but it will work with Fedora 17. For fedora 16 and older verions, to upgrade fedora to newer verion, we used “Preupgrade”

      Before you do anything, **backup** your important data first to external hard drive, usb disk or to any another machine.

      # yum install fedup -y
      # yum update
      # reboot

      After your system rebooted, run

      # fedup-cli –reboot –network 19

      source: http://namhuy.net/1358/upgrade-fedora-18-to-19.html

  1. “2. Automatic bug reporting tool”

    This isn’t new in F19, not remotely – we’ve had automated crash submission from the installer since, man, I think at least since F12 when I started on Fedora.

    “In the KDE Spin, you can change the firewall zone for an interface from the NetworkManager setting. That is not possible from the NetworkManager window of the GNOME Shell.”

    Yes, it is. Select the connection, hit the ‘properties’ button (that cog icon at bottom right), click Identity, there’s a ‘Firewall Zone’ drop-down right there.

    “So given that the third attempt was successful, I can say with some degree of confidence that Anaconda has a nasty but at the step of the installation process shown in the image below.”

    That’s odd: I haven’t seen a single crash there and I’ve run thousands of F19 installs. But then, I don’t use the resize function much (personally I’d rather resize a partition prior to an installation attempt; partition resizing is just a finicky thing to deal with). Perhaps it can crash if you happen to try and set the root password while the resize operation is in place? I’m not sure why that would happen, but it’s all I can think of. It would certainly help if you’d file bug reports for the crashes: we have no chance of fixing them without reports (containing all that data the bug reporting tool provided).

    “Though Anaconda has most or all advanced features in place, a few basic ones, like being able to specify a bootloader password and install the bootloader to a location other than the Master Boot Record (MBR), is not in place.”

    The second is an intentional choice, not a ‘missing feature’: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=872826 . The first is possible via kickstart, I don’t know if it’s intentional or an oversight that it is not available through the GUI.

    “One thing I fail to understand about the GNOME Shell, is why the Suspend option is not in the User Menu or why it’s not listed in the shutdown options window. Instead, the developers decided that the place location for it is on the login screen. So if you are logged into the system and wish to put the computer in Suspend mode, you have to first logout of the system. Bad implementation!”

    Hold down alt, and Power Off turns into Suspend. If you recall, back around 3.0 – 3.4, there was no Power Off option, only Suspend, and people bitched so much about that it was changed: you could hold down alt to turn Suspend into Power Off. I think in 3.6 it was flipped so it’s Power Off by default and you hold alt to turn it into Suspend.

    “I’m not a big user of keyboard shortcuts, which means that to get to the Frequent-ly used application picker view of the GNOME Shell requires two mouse clicks.”

    I really, _really_ don’t get why people don’t just use the ‘press start key, type name of thing you want to launch’ method. It is the way the Shell’s designed to work and by far the easiest way to launch anything.

    “Fedora 19 GNOME 3 ships with a welcome application or desktop greeter that I think is an attempt to implement a Kaptan-like application for Fedora. Kaptan is a desktop greeter for Pardus, a Turkish Linux distribution. It runs on first boot (or first login) and can be run at any other time.”

    I’d never heard of ‘Kaptan’ and I don’t think the GNOME devs had either. gnome-initial-setup is rather a part of the ‘GNOME OS’ effort – https://wiki.gnome.org/GnomeOS/ . GNOME project has this grand vision for a complete vertical stack from the installer to the desktop, of which g-i-s is a part. Note that the ‘ideal’ installer for GNOME OS would be something substantially simpler than anaconda – the GNOME devs would take the account creation bits out of anaconda entirely if given the choice, for instance.

    “Compared to Kaptan and Kapudan, Fedora’s desktop greeter is very basic. All it allows you to do is change input sources and configure online accounts.”

    It actually lets you set your language as well, and configure a wireless network if that’s necessary. And set some date/time options.

    “The Fedora team might want to consider borrowing some features from Kaptan and Kapudan.”

    g-i-s is a GNOME component, not a Fedora component.

    ““Almost all,” because the startup or auto-start module is missing. I found that in order to configure a program to start automatically at login, I had to drop to the command-line and type gnome-session-properties, then configure the target application from its interface.”

    This is intentional (on GNOME’s part): they consider session management deprecated and would rather you just suspend/resume the system instead. They intentionally hid g-s-p from the menus.

    “A question I always ask myself whenever I install a Fedora KDE edition is this: Why is Konqueror the default Web browser? I’ve written about this before and it bears repeating here. Konqueror is a powerful application, supporting more protocols than any other (Web browser). but as a dedicated Web browser, it’s terrible.”

    The Fedora KDE devs subscribe to the ‘KDE is a complete environment’ philosophy. This kind of choice is entirely up to the team maintaining a given desktop, and that’s what the Fedora KDE devs decided.

    “For power-users, holding down the Alt and F2 brings up a very useful utility of the KDE desktop. From this small app that pops up, you can search for local content, online content by specifying “gg” (that’s short for Google), though the Youtube and Wikipedia plugins don’t seem to work, because I could not get results by typing in a search term I now can only be returned from the Internet.”

    That’s exactly the intended main interaction method of GNOME’s Overview search which you seem so unwilling to use!

    “So like the Linux Mint developers, it seems that whoever is responsible for rolling the main edition of Fedora 19 has a grudge against games”

    The teams for each spin choose the package loadout, not any ‘central authority’. The lack of games on the GNOME spin is for a simple and boring reason: lack of space. Check the GNOME spin image size, it’s about 2MB under 1GB, which is its size target. We had to hack a lot of stuff out to keep it under 1GB for F19. Definitely no room for games. I don’t know why the KDE spin doesn’t include more, but honestly, it’s kind of a futile pursuit: it tends to be the case that each person has just one or two little time-waster games they like to play but everyone’s is different, so we can’t ever include all the ones to make everyone happy. Probably just easier you install the one(s) you want yourself.

    “Regarding consistency in management applications, especially with respects to the graphical package manager, I think the time is ripe for the Fedora team to give users the same experience across the different Spins and the main edition.”

    I think the KDE spin actually included gnome-packagekit for a while but found that it didn’t always work right in the KDE env and brought in a bunch of deps, hence the desire to use Apper once it was mature enough.

    “And it might just be better to port an existing one than to code one from scratch. None of the ones I have in mind are perfect, but the best candidate is Linux Deepin’s DSC.”

    Unlikely unless it’s a PK front end. There are a couple of plans for writing an ‘app store’ type interface for Fedora, though.

    1. “Yes, it is. Select the connection, hit the ‘properties’ button (that cog icon at bottom right), click Identity, there’s a ‘Firewall Zone’ drop-down right there.”

      There is no Firewall drop-down here in my Fedora 19 installation. (network-manager-applet-0.9.8.2-1.fc19)

  2. “In this latest release, another upgrade script called fedora-upgrade was stable enough to be included.”

    fedora-upgrade is included because someone submitted it as a package, that’s all. It is not an officially recommended upgrade method, and personally, I’m not a fan of it: if you want to upgrade via yum it’s probably better just to run each step manually so you know what the hell’s going on, and if you want a ‘supported’ upgrade method, use fedup. But that’s just my personal opinion.

    To be clear, fedora-upgrade is essentially simply a script which ‘automates’ the steps for a yum upgrade recommended at https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Upgrading_Fedora_using_yum .

  3. I feel sorry for the fedora devs, they do a step forward and two backwards. What a lame installer, really. If you want to kill the proyect there are many less painful ways.

  4. “7. GNOME 3 Edition: […]One thing I fail to understand about the GNOME Shell, is why the Suspend option is not in the User Menu or why it’s not listed in the shutdown options window.”

    Suspend option is in User Menu by holding the Alt key which will replace “Power off”

    “I’m not a big user of keyboard shortcuts, which means that to get to the Frequent-ly used application picker view of the GNOME Shell requires two mouse clicks.”

    That is where the dock on the left side comes in handy by adding your favourite applications and removing the least used one.

    “Compared to Kaptan and Kapudan, Fedora’s desktop greeter is very basic. All it allows you to do is change input sources and configure online accounts. ”

    Reading your “Every distribution should have its own Kapudan” article, one of commentators raise good points like: need to create folders (why doing it when a preset is already made), secure system (unneeded since Fedora enabled security tools by default), services (handled by systemd) to name a few. Detection of components like Bluetooth or printers should be automatically handled with minimum interaction possible. Note those post installation setting are mainly specific to desktop environments.

    1. A desktop greeter does not have to duplicate what’s on Kapudan. I’m sure there are any number of user-configurable options in, say, the GNOME 3 edition that could be part of a desktop greeter. GNOME Tweak Tool itself could be fashioned into a desktop greeter.

      So, what again is the benefit of hiding the Suspend option behind a keyboard shortcut? What should take 2 mouse-clicks to get to, now takes the same number of clicks plus a key press.

      1. Tweak tools is considered as advanced options users wish to modify. Most ordinary users wanted to get a go and configure their desktops later.

        “So, what again is the benefit of hiding the Suspend option behind a keyboard shortcut? What should take 2 mouse-clicks to get to, now takes the same number of clicks plus a key press.”

        Only two mouse-click? What about double-click? This is very much a nitpick. Reason is ergonomic. You have both hands so why only use one? You can set both suspend and poweroff with the help of dconf-editor.

          1. True. The cat could be nearby, or the dog needs petting, or something just needs to be scratched or squeezed. You never know.

      2. “So, what again is the benefit of hiding the Suspend option behind a keyboard shortcut?”

        I don’t really know, but for some reason the GNOME devs are hell-bent on there only being one such option on the User menu. There’s an extension which puts them both there all the time, though.

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