Package Manager

Fedora 13 review

FedoraFedora 13 is the latest update to the Redhat-sponsored, RPM-based Linux distribution. It has long held a reputation of being a testbed for features that will eventually make it into Redhat Enterprise Linux, and, therefore, less stable than other desktop-oriented distributions. And I think that's one reason why Fedora has features that you'll not find on other desktop-focused distributions. It's not a distribution that works out of the box, but if you are willing to spend an hour or so tweaking it, you can get it to the point where it just works. With this short review, I'll present some of this distro's best features, features that may entice potential users. I'll also give a listing of those features that are not very well implemented, or are missing and would, therefore, create usability issues for users - especially new users. ...
GRUB.conf

Going Paranoid on Fedora 13

FedoraA Paranoid, or 5-star, security rating is the highest physical security rating that you can achieve on your computer. It entails enabling a set of OS-dependent and OS-independent features. But why would anyone want to achieve such a high physical security rating on Fedora or any other distribution? Strict control of who can access your data if your computer falls into the wrong hands, that's why. The point is, if your computer is stolen, or seized by agents of the state, you do not want to make it easy for them to access your data. In fact, you want to make it impossible for them to access your data. ...
Passphrase

Manual LVM configuration on Fedora 13

FedoraFedora 13 is one of the Linux distributions that supports and uses Linux Logical Volume Manager (LVM) as the default disk partitioning scheme. While this is a good thing (it has its benefits), the space allocation to the partitions and logical volumes is not optimal. This tutorial provides a step by step guide on how to configure LVM (on Fedora 13) in a manner that satisfies the basic guidelines of LVM configuration. So if you have the installation disk ready, insert into your computer's optical drive and let's get started. Note that this tutorial involves a computer with only one hard disk. You may or may not get to see this window, but if you do, just select the disk you would like to use for the installation, then click "Next." [caption id="attachment_5530" align="aligncenter" width="549" caption="Select disk to use for installation"]Select disk[/caption] ...
Passphrase request

Disk encryption on Fedora 13

FedoraDisk encryption is one very important tool that you can use to enhance the physical security posture of our computer, and Fedora is the only distribution that makes it very easy for every computer user to enjoy its security benefits. Fedora 13's implementation of disk encryption is still the same as on prior releases. The only difference is that the position of the check box to enable it changed from close to the top of the window, to very near the bottom. By default, the box is unchecked. All that's needed to encrypt your disk then is to make sure that the check box next to "Encrypt system" is enabled before you click the "Next" button. [caption id="attachment_5485" align="aligncenter" width="549" caption="Disk partitioning options"]Partition options[/caption] ...
Default partitions

LVM configuration on Fedora 13

FedoraFedora is one of a handful of Linux distributions that adopts the Linux Logical Volume Manager (LVM) as its default disk partitioning scheme. LVM provides more flexible disk management capabilities than the age-old UNIX/Linux method, and that's why I prefer Linux distributions with support for it over those that do not. The problem with Fedora's default LVM configuration is that the allocation of disk space to the logical volumes violates a very simple guideline that you are encouraged to abide by: Allocate just enough disk space to each logical volume that's required to get your system up and running. In other words, leave some disk space unallocated in case you need it to grow a logical volume or to create a new logical volume for a special purpose. ...
Installation type

New storage options for Anaconda on Fedora 13

FedoraFedora 13 Beta has just been released for testing and bug reporting, with the stable version slated for release in May. Thanks to boot.fedoraproject.org, I didn't have to download the full CD iso image. Used the same bfo iso image from last month and took the Fedora 13 beta out for spin. But rather than dish out a full review of this beta release (I only review stable releases), I'm using this article to showcase a new storage feature of Anaconda. A storage capability that is not available on any other non-enterprise Linux distribution. To start with, Anaconda now offers two device installation options. The first and the default is Basic Storage Devices. Sticking with this option will take you to the next page which presents the same disk partitioning options as prior Fedora versions. The second option, Specialized Storage Devices, gives you installation choices typically found in enterprise environments. ...
Disable IPv6

Testing Fedora 13 alpha with BFO

FedoraFedora 13 alpha has been released, and the faithful are encouraged to download, test and report. The traditional method of testing is to download a full CD iso image (about 700 MB), but if you read the recent post about Network booting with boot.fedoraproject.org, you'd have learned that all you now need to do to install any version of Fedora is to download a very small iso image (626 KB). When that article was published, Fedora 13 had not yet been released, so the option to install it was not available in BFO. The screenshot below shows BFO's installation page before the release of Fedora 13 alpha. ...
BFO experimental options

Network booting with boot.fedoraproject.org

Fedora  Boot.fedoraproject.org (BFO) is Fedora's implementation of boot.kernel.org, a project designed to give computers the capability to boot from a network. The actual program that provides this capability is gPXE, which evolved from the Etherboot project. Fedora's twist on gPXE allows you to network-boot current, past and future (Rawhide) releases of Fedora. All you need to do is download a small iso image (the current BFO weighs in at just 626 KB), transfer it to a media, boot of that media and perform any number of tasks that you would normally perform with a full CD or DVD iso image. The next few shots will take you through the features of BFO. ...
Passphrase

How Fedora protects your data with full disk encryption

FedoraDisk encryption in one of the most overlooked and underused security tools in computing. When most people think about securing a computer or the operating system that powers it, a firewall, anti-virus, and other anti-malware software comes to mind. Those are all good and necessary tools, but they are only concerned with network security. What about physical security? What happens if someone gains unauthorized, physical access to your computer? Even with all the fancy firewall and other network security tools running, If the disk is not encrypted, check mate! Your data is now shared. ...
Fedora 17 GNOME Panel-Docklet

Fedora 12 review

FedoraFedora 12 is the latest major update to Fedora, the Linux distribution that counts RedHat as a major sponsor. Fedora is Free Software and as a consequence, it is not one of those distros that we expect to "just work" out of the box. So if you are new to Fedora, don't expect the same user-friendliness that you'll get with distros like Pardus, Hymera Open and Mandriva One (or even Mandriva Free). It is, however, still a decent distro. How decent? Continue reading to find out. As is the custom here, we always start with the installer. ...