Celebrating Data Privacy Day

Startpage

Data Privacy DayI’m assuming most people already know this, but if you did not, today is Data Privacy Day. Given that those in control of the wheels of the digital market square we call the Internet do not value our privacy, we have to take this day, every day, to remind us – and them – that privacy matters.

Everyday should be a Data Privacy Day, but there’s nothing wrong in setting one day aside to mark it.

According to Data Privacy Day:

Data Privacy Day is an international celebration of the dignity of the individual expressed through personal information. In this networked world, in which we are thoroughly digitized, with our identities, locations, actions, purchases, associations, movements, and histories stored as so many bits and bytes, we have to ask – who is collecting all of this – what are they doing with it – with whom are they sharing it? Most of all, individuals are asking ‘How can I protect my information from being misused?’ These are reasonable questions to ask – we should all want to know the answers.

I’ve been asking those questions for a very long time, and trying to see what I can do about it. There is no single solution to “How can I protect my information from being misused?,” but I think I have found one to help protect my privacy when I’m searching the Web. By pure coincidence, I found it on Data Privacy Day. Luck me.

Related Post:  Digital Books and Your Rights: A Checklist for Readers

Google is the search engine of choice for majority of netizens. But Google does not respect your privacy. Here’s what Google’s CEO, Erin Schmidt , said:

If you have something that you don’t want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place, … The reality is that search engines, including Google, do retain this information for some time, … We are all subject in the United States to the Patriot Act. It is possible that that information could be made available to the authorities.

Passing “that information … to the authorities” is not the only problem. That information is also sold to third parties, and Google is not the only criminal. Microsoft, Yahoo, and others also do it. But lucky me, I’ve found a search engine that does not store information about me and, therefore, does not have anything to sell or make “available to the authorities.” And that search engine is Startpage.com. Startpage is registered with the Dutch Data Protection Authority and received the first European Privacy Seal Award. Read more about their thoughts on privacy.

Related Post:  Why I Am Against Software Patents

For me, I’m happy to announce that I’ve made Startpage the default search engine for Firefox. Happy Data Privacy Day!

Startpage

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Newsletter: Subscribe for updates

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Get the latest

On social media

Security distros

Hacker
Linux distros for hacking and pentesting

Crypto mining OS

Bitcoin
Distros for mining bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies

Crypto hardware

MSI GeForce GTX 1070
Installing Nvidia GTX 1070 GPU drivers on Ubuntu

Disk guide

LVM
Beginner's guide to disks & disk partitions in Linux
Categories
Archives
0
Hya, what do you think? Please comment.x
()
x
Algorithm 2020

Did you get your ticket yet?

Algorithm 2022 is a 3-day conference on blockchain, cryptocurrencies and AI set for Feb. 10 – 12, 2022, in Dallas. Speakers from the US Air Force, Ministry of Digital Transformation, Ukraine, and more. click that button to learn more and get your ticket. Use BSD20 code for 20% off ticket price.