privacy and licensing

The Multiple Meanings of the Term “Open”

Over the last couple of months I’ve found myself involved, both actively and passively, in several conversations that contained terms like “open” or “openness”. The adjective “open” was associated to nouns like “format”, “standard”, “source”, “government”, “data”, and so forth.

Quite often the use and misuse of the term “open” leads to almost hatred discussions, exuding religious fervor on both camps (those who are for “open” and those who are against). In my honest opinion, most of these battles are fought on the basis of a misunderstanding on either or both parties about what “open” actually means. Usually people confuse the end (such as making something more accessible) with the means (adopting one particular approach).

I would argue that many of those who fight the battle for “open” often lose sight of the reason why they do so. Nobody would deny that making something (a specification, a file format, a data set, a process) more open and transparent and accessible to a larger number of people is a good thing. This clearly implies that there should not be any obstacle for people to get that. Continue reading.

LinuxBSDos needs your donation to continue!

I hope this article has saved you valuable time and effort to fix a problem that would have taken more time than is necessary. That makes me happy, and why I love doing this. But because more people than ever are reading articles like this with an adblocker, ad revenues have fallen to a level that's not enough to cover my operating costs. That's why I want to ask you a favor: To make a one-time or recurring donation to support this site and keep it going. It's a small favor, but every one counts. And you can make your donation using Patreon or directly via Paypal. Thank you for whatever donation you're able to make.

Donate via Patreon. Donate via Paypal.

Aside from donation, you may also signup to receive an email once I publish new content. Your email will not be shared or traded to anyone. And you can unsubscribe at any time.

Please share:

We Recommend These Vendors and Free Offers

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).

Want to become an expert ethical hacker and penetration tester? Request your free video training course of Online Penetration Testing and Ethical Hacking

Whether you're new to Linux or are a Linux guru, you can learn a lot more about the Linux kernel by requesting your free ebook of Linux Kernel In A Nutshell.


Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*