2014: Ringing it in by migrating from Apache to Nginx

Happy new year everybody. 2013 was brutal, but I think 2014 will be much better.

I’ve spent the past week moving this website from a provider based in the UK to one based in the US of A. Moving from a fully-managed provider to a self-managed system was not as easy as I thought, but the process is almost complete. The core (the website) has been moved, but moving the email system is still a work in progress.

Until yesterday, this website was running on a Enterprise Red Hat based distribution using the Apache Web server. Today, it’s brought to you on the Nginx Web server. For me, what that means is a faster and more responsive website, and one that’s not as expensive to maintain.

Like most people in this space, I’ve long known about Nginx, but until last week, I’ve never used or even installed it on any of my test servers. I’ve read about how Nginx is like the Xfce desktop of Web servers – in terms of resource usage, but until I actually saw it in action, what I knew about it was second-hand knowledge.

Now I know. When it comes to resource usage, Nginx is stingy – in a positive sense. And when it comes to loading Web pages fast, it beats Apache by a mile. And I am still tuning it.

The experience of migrating from Apache to Nginx is worth at least three articles, and I will post a step-by-step tutorial of how to do it, for the benefit of those who might want to do the same thing. For the record, this website and another one, is running on a DigitalOcean Droplet that’s using less than 512 MB of RAM. What’s more impressive is that php5-fpm has not been optimized, so it’s using up more CPU and RAM than it’s supposed to.

So there you have it, I celebrated the last day of 2013 by migrating from Apache to Nginx. If you must do the same, consider an account at DigitalOcean. For $5 a month, you get a VPS server with 512 MB of RAM and 20 GB of SSD storage. And if you sign up with this referral link, you help to keep the website afloat.
DigitalOcean SSD droplet

Related Posts

New MCUs from TI bring Haptics to the fingertips of Joe Developer Texas Instruments has announced the release of a new MSP430TCH5E haptics-enabled microcontrollers. The microcontrollers allow any developer to "add...
Three New Android Vulnerabilities Released Smartphone security has become a popular topic amongst security researchers, with three new vulnerabilities released in the last two weeks alone. Spea...
Snowden on Dropbox: It’s hostile to privacy Dropbox is a very popular Cloud storage services, but is it good for the privacy-conscious? According to Edward Snowden, it's not. In an intervi...
Wget and the user agent option Wget is a command-line utility for downloading files. The official description on its man page on my Linux distribution says that it is "free utili...
Mozilla is phasing out SHA-1 based signature algorithms Mozilla's Security Engineering Team has announced that they are proactively phasing out the SHA-1 based signature algorithms for digital certificates,...
Fedora 23 will feature a Cinnamon Spin The Cinnamon desktop is the only popular desktop environment that Fedora does not have a Spin for. But that should change, unless something really...

We Recommend These Vendors and Free Offers

ContainerizeThis 2016 is a free, 2-day conference for all things containers and big data. Featured, will be presentations and free, hands-on workshops. Learn more at ContainerizeThis.com

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).

Want to become an expert ethical hacker and penetration tester? Request your free video training course of Online Penetration Testing and Ethical Hacking

Whether you're new to Linux or are a Linux guru, you can learn a lot more about the Linux kernel by requesting your free ebook of Linux Kernel In A Nutshell.


2 Comments

  1. I’m looking forward to seeing your howtos. I’ve been testing nginx on my dev server before rolling it out for my prod web sites.

    Sadly, I’m having issues fixing the rewrites and things for wordpress. I’d like to see how you did it all.

    Thanks!

    -Matt

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*