The problem with using CAcert’s digital certificates

Nothing drives away visitors to a website faster than seeing a warning message that informs them that the site or page they clicked to visit is not trusted.

It’s a guaranteed traffic killer. No Web publisher wants visitors to see that type of message. But that is exactly what they will see if the publisher uses an SSL certificate issued by CAcert.

Why? Because nobody that matters in the industry seems to trust CAcert as a Certificate Authority. If you are wondering who or what CAcert is, it is a “community driven Certificate Authority that issues certificates to the public at large for free.” And their goal is to “promote awareness and education on computer security through the use of encryption, specifically with the X.509 family of standards.”

The problem, as stated earlier, is that browser vendors do not ship CAcert’s root certificates by default. Why? It’s a long story, but the gist is, they don’t trust the certificates. So if you are a Web publisher and are considering a CAcert-issued digital certificate, do yourself a favor and get one issued by a trusted certificate authority. Yes, they cost money, but the traffic (and money) you lose from scared visitors could be more than you spend for a commercial certificate.

I decided to write this article after I saw the usual “invalid certificate warning” when attempting to visit OpenMandriva’s wiki page. Yes, you may opt to add an exception to the certificate, but most users, including this author, will simple click the back button or close the browser tab or window.
CAcert ssl root certificate

With its bright-red background, the warning looks even more ominous if you tried to visit the page using the Chromium browser. So whoever is in charge of OpenMandriva, here’s a friendly message: Please get a digital certificate from a trusted source.
CAcert untrusted digital certificate Chromium

Related Posts

France warns against using Internet Explorer France has echoed calls by the German government for web users to find an alternative to Microsoft's Internet Explorer (IE) to protect security. Ce...
How to create a laser light show with Fedora Every day, people are making all kinds of incredible software powered by Fedora. The Fedora user community is broad and diverse, and sometimes, we...
ZShaolin keeps getting better. Now has vim, nmap, git, rsync, and ssh Remember ZShaolin? Yep, it's that Android ninja tool that gives you zsh and a whole bunch of command-line applications on your Android device, minus t...
New MCUs from TI bring Haptics to the fingertips of Joe Developer Texas Instruments has announced the release of a new MSP430TCH5E haptics-enabled microcontrollers. The microcontrollers allow any developer to "add...
ZeroDB, a end-to-end encrypted database, is now open source ZeroDB is a new database application with a very cool feature. At a time when security is foremost in the minds of most people in this digital age,...
SSLMate: Buy and install DV SSL certificates from the command line Looking for a tool to facilitate buying and installing SSL certificates for your website? SSLMate to the rescue! SSLMate is the second and latest t...

We Recommend These Vendors and Free Offers

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).

Want to become an expert ethical hacker and penetration tester? Request your free video training course of Online Penetration Testing and Ethical Hacking

Whether you're new to Linux or are a Linux guru, you can learn a lot more about the Linux kernel by requesting your free ebook of Linux Kernel In A Nutshell.


One Comment

  1. Oydenos recommends Perspectives.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*