No, that “Most Trusted Company for Privacy Award” does not compute

I think most people read about the “Most Trusted Internet Company for Privacy Award” via a blog post from the Mozilla Foundation, publisher of the Firefox Web browser. The title of the blog post is “Mozilla Recognized as Most Trusted Internet Company for Privacy.”

It’s important to note that the keyword term here is “Internet Company,” because the study is published as the “Most Trusted Company for Privacy Award.” The company that took home the overall honor is American Express. Mozilla ranked 20 overall, but ranked at the top of the Internet & Social Media subgroup.

The thing that caught my attention as I read the report (pdf), is that Verizon and Microsoft also made the Top 20. Verizon was actually number 1 in the Communications subgroup. I think that’s interesting because a key finding of the study revealed that “the number one privacy-related concern expressed by 61 percent of respondents is identity, closely followed by an increase in government surveillance (56 percent).”

How can people be very concerned about government surveillance, and still trust a company like Microsoft? What are all those backdoors in their products for? And if people are concerned about government surveillance, what about surveillance by private organizations? Has anybody looked into backdoors in Verizon’s Internet routers?

I think the research participants were (are) clueless and I’m willing to bet that readers of this blog or any other tech-related blog will not consider Verizon and Microsoft as trustworthy.

The institute did acknowledge in the report that:

… the ratings may not reflect at all the actual privacy practices of the company and its efforts to protect the personal information of its customers and employees. Further, what a company does in the area of privacy and data protection can be invisible to the consumer until he or she experiences a problem and seeks redress or has a question about the organization’s privacy and data protection practices that needs to be answered.

Ponemon Institute LLC is an independent research institute based in Traverse City, Michigan USA. The study is an annual tradition.

Related Posts

GNUnet submits draft for p2p-related TLDs to the IETF A GNUnet official, has submitted a request to the IETF, the Internet Engineering Task Force, the organization responsible for developing and promoting...
Securely storing your secrets in R code Last month I wrote about How to store and use webservice keys and authentication details, a summary of the options mentioned in a twitter discussion s...
Turbo charge your Android Opera Mobile 10.1 beta source: Android users now have a new choice when it comes to browsers. Today, Opera Software announced that Opera Mobile 10.1 beta is available in the...
Mark Shuttleworth on Western media, Iraq, IS and Ukraine It's very rare that the CEO of a technology outfit that's based in the West takes an open stance on hot-button geopolitical issues. It's even rarer th...
Learn how to encrypt email communications with an email self-defense guide from the FSF The Free Software Foundation (FSF) has released an email self-defense guide that shows how anybody can encrypt their email communications. It requires...
Android Flashlight app deceptively collected and sold location data Brightest Flashlight Free is an Android app developed by GoldenShores Technologies, LLC that turned an Android smartphone into a flashlight. It wa...

We Recommend These Vendors and Free Offers

ContainerizeThis 2016 is a free, 2-day conference for all things containers and big data. Featured, will be presentations and free, hands-on workshops. Learn more at ContainerizeThis.com

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).

Want to become an expert ethical hacker and penetration tester? Request your free video training course of Online Penetration Testing and Ethical Hacking

Whether you're new to Linux or are a Linux guru, you can learn a lot more about the Linux kernel by requesting your free ebook of Linux Kernel In A Nutshell.


2 Comments

  1. I didn’t trust the Pokemon Institute anyway..

  2. Pingback: Links 30/1/2013: Android Market Share at 70% | Techrights

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*