Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” released

After 24 months of constant development, the Debian Project is proud to present its new stable version 6.0 (code name “Squeeze”). Debian 6.0 is a free operating system, coming for the first time in two flavours. Alongside Debian GNU/Linux, Debian GNU/kFreeBSD is introduced with this version as a “technology preview”.

Debian 6.0 includes the KDE Plasma Desktop and Applications, the GNOME, Xfce, and LXDE desktop environments as well as all kinds of server applications. It also features compatibility with the FHS v2.3 and software developed for version 3.2 of the LSB.

Debian runs on computers ranging from palmtops and handheld systems to supercomputers, and on nearly everything in between. A total of nine architectures are supported by Debian GNU/Linux: 32-bit PC / Intel IA-32 (i386), 64-bit PC / Intel EM64T / x86-64 (amd64), Motorola/IBM PowerPC (powerpc), Sun/Oracle SPARC (sparc), MIPS (mips (big-endian) and mipsel (little-endian)), Intel Itanium (ia64), IBM S/390 (s390), and ARM EABI (armel).

Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” introduces technical previews of two new ports to the kernel of the FreeBSD project using the known Debian/GNU userland: Debian GNU/kFreeBSD for the 32-bit PC (kfreebsd-i386) and the 64-bit PC (kfreebsd-amd64). These ports are the first ones ever to be included in a Debian release which are not based on the Linux kernel. The support of common server software is strong and combines the existing features of Linux-based Debian versions with the unique features known from the BSD world. However, for this release these new ports are limited; for example, some advanced desktop features are not yet supported.

Another first is the completely free Linux kernel, which no longer contains problematic firmware files. These were split out into separate packages and moved out of the Debian main archive into the non-free area of our archive, which is not enabled by default. In this way Debian users have the possibility of running a completely free operating system, but may still choose to use non-free firmware files if necessary. Firmware files needed during installation may be loaded by the installation system; special CD images and tarballs for USB based installations are available too. More information about this may be found in the Debian Firmware wiki page. Read the complete new release here, and download an ISO image here.

Related Posts

How to develop your own Raspberry Pi operating system Why use an existing operating system if you can bake your own? Well, for one thing, writing an OS is not an easy feat. It requires a lot of knowledge ...
Ten Billion Bits of Entanglement Achieved in Silicon Scientists from Oxford University have made a significant step towards an ultrafast quantum computer by successfully generating 10 billion bits of qua...
What is the best blogging platform built atop Node.js? After about six years of using WordPress as the blogging  platform for this website, I have come to the stage where I want to try something else. Some...
Set up, run a pentest lab on AWS or Google Cloud with Kali Linux, Metasploitable and WebGo... Editor: Kali Linux is a special Linux distribution designed just for penetration testing, or pentesting. It is based on Debian Testing, and is one of ...
LinHES R8 home entertainment system Released LinHES R8 has been released. LinHES is a Linux distribution that can be used to convert any PC into a home entertainment system. That how it gained...
New Standard Proposed for Supercomputing A new supercomputer rating system will be released by an international team led by Sandia National Laboratories at the Supercomputing Conference 2010 ...

We Recommend These Vendors and Free Offers

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).

Want to become an expert ethical hacker and penetration tester? Request your free video training course of Online Penetration Testing and Ethical Hacking

Whether you're new to Linux or are a Linux guru, you can learn a lot more about the Linux kernel by requesting your free ebook of Linux Kernel In A Nutshell.


One Comment

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” released -- Topsy.com

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*