Tutorials/Tips

How to secure your Wi-Fi devices and personal data

Here are a few key things that Wi-Fi users can do to secure their Wi-Fi devices and personal data:

  • Set home Wi-Fi networks for WPA2™ security – Wi-Fi Protected Access® 2 (WPA2) is the latest in network security technology. It controls who connects to the network and encrypts data for privacy. It is important to note that the security level of a home network is determined by the least capable device and many devices ship with security options disabled as the default. For the most up-to-date protection, a network should include only products capable of WPA2 security.
  • Look for Wi-Fi CERTIFIED™ products – Wi-Fi CERTIFIED devices are required to implement WPA2 security.
  • Look for devices with Wi-Fi Protected Setup™ – With an action as simple as the push of a button, new devices can be added to an existing network securely.
  • Create strong passwords – Ensure that your network password is at least 8 characters long, does not include any dictionary words or personal information, and is a mix of upper and lower case letters and symbols. A tip that might make password management easier is to create an acronym from easy-to-remember phrases. For example, “my daughter’s birthday is July 7, 1987” could become the password “MDBi7787.”
  • Be smart about hotspot use – Most public hotspots leave security protections turned off, so while connecting to a public Wi-Fi hotspot is great for general internet surfing, users should not transmit sensitive data, such bank account login information.
  • Turn off automatic connecting – Many products such as mobile phones and notebooks are set by default to sense and automatically connect to any available wireless signal. Users should turn off automatic connecting and only connect to and from networks and devices they are familiar with.
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The foregoing were published by the Wi-Fi Alliance in a new release to educate users about securing their wireless networks and devices. You may read the complete news release here.

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  1. Pingback: Links 4/2/2011: GNOME 3.0 Laptop Debate, Unified Packaging Arguments | Techrights

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