How to install Ubuntu on a btrfs file system

UbuntuUbuntu 10.10 beta is the latest Linux distribution release to have support for the btrfs file system. Btrfs (B-tree File System) is a copy-on-write file system for Linux. As far as I am aware of, Fedora and Sabayon are the other (Linux) distributions with support for it during installation.

While btrfs changes how we manage disks on Linux, you should be aware that is still under heavy development and not yet ready for use on production systems. Taken from the man page of btrfsctl, the main management command line tool for btrfs: “Btrfs is currently under heavy development, and not suitable for any uses other than benchmarking and review.”

With the minor points cleared up, let’s begin the installation – at the disk detection stage. Because btrfs is the not default file system, we need to choose the Specify partitions manually (Advanced) option. I think the Install Now button should read Forward, but since it says Install Now, click on it to move to the next step.

buntu1010
Manual option

The computer used for this installation has an existing Linux installation on the /dev/sdc disk which I do not intend to keep. So I am going to delete the partitions.

buntu1
Existing disk partitions

With the partitions deleted, now I can start creating new partitions for installing Ubuntu 10.10 beta. The boot partitioning scheme I am going to use for this installation involves creating three partitions – one for /boot, the second for the btrfs file system, and the last for swap space. To create the first partition, select the free space and click on the Add button.

Note: /dev/sdd is a USB flash drive attached to the computer. It will not be used in this installation.

buntu2
Sanitized disk partitions

For the /boot partition, I allocated a disk space of 500 MB. That is now the recommended disk space for /boot, especially for a system that you will be using for an extended period. For file system, ext4 is the recommended. OK.

buntu3
Create /boot partition

With the /boot partition created, select the free space and click on the Add button to create the next partition.

buntu4
Select free space

The main disk drive on this computer is about 640 GB. Because I intend to dual-boot Ubuntu 10.10 beta and Linux Mint Debian, I am going to use only half of the disk space for Ubuntu and the other half for Linux Mint Debian. So I assigned 300 GB disk space to this partition, and btrfs for file system. Mount point is /. OK

buntu5
Create / partition

Related Posts

Fluentd vs. Logstash: A Comparison of Log Collectors The unsung heroes of log analysis are the log collectors. They are the hard-working daemons that run on servers to pull server metrics, parse log file...
How to dual-boot Kali Linux 1.0.9 and Windows 7/8 on a PC with UEFI firmware The last dual-boot tutorial on Kali Linux I wrote was back in March 2013 (see Dual-boot Windows 7 and Kali Linux), and that was on a computer with Leg...
Dual-booting Linux Mint 10 KDE and Windows 7 This is the latest article in the series on dual-booting Windows 7 and Linux distributions. It is intended for those new to Linux, and who might need ...
GNOME 3.12: The cool and the not-so cool features GNOME 3.12 was released on March 26 (2014), but it didn't start shipping on many distributions until very recently. In this post, I'll let you in on w...
Mandriva Linux 2009 Firewall The Linux operating system has its own built-in, enterprise-grade firewall. However, not all Linux distributions ship with a graphical client fro conf...
Have a Happy Holidays and give GRUB a look to match your mood Not too long ago, it was January, and in a few days, it will be another month of January. Time really does fly. But what can we do? Go with the...

We Recommend These Vendors and Free Offers

ContainerizeThis 2016 is a free, 2-day conference for all things containers and big data. Featured, will be presentations and free, hands-on workshops. Learn more at ContainerizeThis.com

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).

Want to become an expert ethical hacker and penetration tester? Request your free video training course of Online Penetration Testing and Ethical Hacking

Whether you're new to Linux or are a Linux guru, you can learn a lot more about the Linux kernel by requesting your free ebook of Linux Kernel In A Nutshell.


4 Comments

  1. OMG! The one feature which makes using BTRFS sensible now (on netbooks) would be its inherent compression support. Judging from the screenshots, the Ubuntu developers disapprove of that. Again.

  2. Pingback: Install Ubuntu on btrfs « 0ddn1x: tricks with *nix

  3. OpenSUSE 11.3 also supports BTRFS ‘out of the box.’ I’m using it right now with my home partition, and though I’ve had not the least trouble with it, I haven’t really seen many benefits either.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*