Fedora 13 btrfs installation guide

This is the boot loader configuration page. The security conscious may choose to specify a boot loader password here. A boot loader password is one of the methods you may employ to boost the physical security rating of your computer. On my personal computers and servers, I always specify a boot loader password. Next.

GRUB options

Here you can customize the software that will be installed and the repositories that will be consulted for the installation. The default options here should suffice. Next. This marks the last step in the first phase of the installation of Fedora 13 via the bfo or DVD methods. The computer should be rebooted after this step.

Software and repository options

This is the start of the last phase in the installation process. Click Forward to continue.

Second phase of the installation begins

This is just to inform you, if you are new to Linux and to Fedora, that the Linux distribution you just installed is made up of software licensed under the GNU General Public License, a license that gives you the freedom to use your computer and the software installed on it any way you see fit. Forward.

GPL license agreement

Create a user account at this step. This is the user account that you will use to log into the computer. To optimize security, it is recommended that the password you specify here not be the same as the password you specified for the root account in the first phase of the installation process. It is also recommended that it not be the same as the boot loader password, that is, if you specified a boot loader password.

Create user account

By default, the computer’s clock will be set manually. However, you may opt to use the Network Time Protocol, NTP, to automatically synchronize the computer’s clock with that of NTP servers on the Internet. If you opt to, and it is recommended that you do, your computer will be acting as an NTP client. Note that if you have more than one computer in your local network, you can set one of them to be an NTP server for the other computers, while it is also acting as an NTP client synching with NTP servers on the Internet.

Enable the Network Time Protocol

Finally, the last step in the installation process. This is optional, but it is one way to give back to the community. All you are being asked to do is opt in to submit your computer’s profile to a remote database where all such information is collected. It is for the good of all. Make the right choice. Click Finish, and enjoy the future in Linux file systems – Btrfs.

Hardware profile submission options

Related Posts

How to install Cinnamon in Sabayon 8 I think I have lost count of how many Cinnamon-related tutorials I have published in the last two weeks. If nothing else, it goes to show what I think...
Solution for crashing KDE applications on Linux Mint 17.1 Cinnamon On one of my test systems, I have Linux Mint 17.1 Cinnamon installed. However, I still like to use KSnapshot, the screenshot application for KDE. A...
Install Steam client on Fedora 18 Since everybody seems to be Steam-ing and the Steam client is not in the default Fedora 18 repository, I think the logical thing to do is write a shor...
Dual-boot Windows 7 and Antergos on a PC with 2 HDDs and UEFI firmware This post shows how to dual-boot Windows 7 and Antergos 2014.05.26 on a computer with two hard disk drives (HDD) and UEFI firmware. The test computer ...
How to reset user password on Ubuntu 14.10 After publishing How to reset passwords on Fedora 21 and 22, I thought it was appropriate to do the same for Ubuntu 14.10. So this tutorial will sh...
NetworkManager: Secret weapon for the Linux road warrior NetworkManager is one of those "must-have" and "must-be-installed-by-default" applications that I like to see running on any Linux or BSD desktop dist...

We Recommend These Vendors

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).


  1. Respected Fedora Members,
    it was nice documentation on fedora 13 installtion part.
    I really liked it.
    will implement it in my system.
    Thank You.
    karan doshi.
    Redhat ceritfied engineer.

  2. Pingback: Links 4/8/2010: Preview of KDE 4.5, KDE 4.5 RC3 in Mandriva 2010.1 | Techrights

  3. This makes me almost want to try out Fedora, especially since Ubuntu takes that f**ing long to implement such basic features. I wonder if you can set the btrfs “compress” option here though.

    (But, the first Anaconda screenshots looks like low usability. Why is it “Basic Storage Devices” and not just “Hard Disk” or mentioning the second with “… (Datacenter)”. And why make users guess with “If you’re not sure… this is probably it”?)

    • Well, if you are not sure of what option(s) to choose, it’s always safe to go with the default(s). When it doubt, take the road oft recommended.

  4. Pingback: Ganalot! » Blog Archive » Instalación Fedora Linux en PS3

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *