In Networks We Trust

European researchers are proposing a paradigm-shifting solution to trusted computing that offers better security and authentication with none of the drawbacks that exist in the current state of the art.

Trusted computing (TC) is a hot topic in computer science. Major software and hardware providers are planning to include TC components in the next generation of computers, and the US army and the US Department of Defence reportedly require trusted platform modules on all their computers.

Trusted computing is a system comprising hardware and software modules that ensures that the software running on a computer has not been altered or maliciously modified after its initial installation, thus ensuring compliance with the original intended functionality. It is a way of enhancing security, preventing viruses and other malicious code, or malware, and protecting intellectual property.

For example, a TC system can verify that a malicious user has not altered the program of the music player on his computer in such a way as to ignore or bypass the checks on the permissions and restrictions of the songs being played. Current systems work but are heavily dependent on hardware which limits their usefulness. A big problem facing computer science now is how to ensure a trusted computing environment on a remote, untrusted, machine. Continue reading.

Related Posts

Federal Intellectual Property Enforcement Gears Up The Obama Administration has been slowly ramping up its attention to intellectual property issues. Over the past few months, we've seen an IP "summit"...
FreeBSD and the GPL Linus Torvalds has said Linux wouldn't have happened if 386BSD had been around when he started up. We trace the history of FreeBSD and how it's affect...
Web 2.0 versus Control 2.0 The fight for free access to information is being played out to an ever greater extent on the Internet. The emerging general trend is that a growing n...
On Selling Exceptions to the GNU GPL When I co-signed the letter objecting to Oracle's planned purchase of MySQL 1 (along with the rest of Sun), some free software supporters were surpris...
KDE Gears Up to a Free Cloud Day 2 of Camp KDE kicked off with a bang when Frank Karlitschek announced the start of a significant new KDE project. The ownCloud initiative will com...
EFF Seeks Attorneys to Help Alleged Movie Downloaders Are you an attorney licensed to practice law in the United States? If you are, EFF needs your help to fight spam-igation. The U.S. Copyright Group ...

We Recommend These Vendors

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).


Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*