Privacy by Design: The 7 Foundational Principles

Privacy by Design is a concept I developed back in the 90’s, to address the ever-growing and systemic effects of Information and Communication Technologies, and of large-scale networked data systems.

Privacy by Design advances the view that the future of privacy cannot be assured solely by compliance with regulatory frameworks; rather, privacy assurance must ideally become an organization’s default mode of operation.

Initially, deploying Privacy-Enhancing Technologies (PETs) was seen as the solution. Today, we realize that a more substantial approach is required — extending the use of PETs to PETS Plus — taking a positive-sum (full functionality) approach, not zero-sum. That’s the “Plus” in PETS Plus: positive-sum, not the either/or of zero-sum (a false dichotomy).

Privacy by Design extends to a “Trilogy” of encompassing applications: 1) IT systems; 2) accountable business practices; and 3) physical design and networked infrastructure.

Principles of Privacy by Design may be applied to all types of personal information, but should be applied with special vigour to sensitive data such as medical information and financial data. The strength of privacy measures tends to be commensurate with the sensitivity of the data.

The objectives of Privacy by Design — ensuring privacy and gaining personal control over one’s information and, for organizations, gaining a sustainable competitive advantage — may be accomplished by practicing the following 7 Foundational Principles:

1. Proactive not Reactive; Preventative not Remedial

The Privacy by Design (PbD) approach is characterized by proactive rather than reactive measures. It anticipates and prevents privacy invasive events before they happen. PbD does not wait for privacy risks to materialize, nor does it offer remedies for resolving privacy infractions once they have occurred – it aims to prevent them from occurring. In short, Privacy by Design comes before-the-fact, not after.

2. Privacy as the Default

We can all be certain of one thing – the default rules! Privacy by Design seeks to deliver the maximum degree of privacy by ensuring that personal data are automatically protected in any given IT system or business practice. If an individual does nothing, their privacy still remains intact. No action is required on the part of the individual to protect their privacy – it is built into the system, by default. Continue reading.

Related Posts

In Networks We Trust European researchers are proposing a paradigm-shifting solution to trusted computing that offers better security and authentication with none of the d...
How essential is anonymity to peer to peer relationality? How essential is anonymity to peer to peer relationality? I believe answering that question becomes easier if we look at the historical development...
Digital Books and Your Rights: A Checklist for Readers I. Introduction After several years of false starts, the universe of digital books seems at last poised to expand dramatically. Readers should view...
Open Source Think Tank: The Way Forward I have just finished attending the Fifth Annual Open Source Think Tank, hosted by Andrew Aitken and I at Meritage in Napa Valley.  Andrew and his te...
How to enhance the physical security posture of your Linux/BSD-powered PC Securing a computer goes beyond more than just using strong passwords. You should consider what happens if an unauthorized person gains physical acce...
Privacy Risks from Geographic Information In today's world more geographic information is being collected about us, such as where we live, where the clinic we visited is located, and where we ...

We Recommend These Vendors and Free Offers

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).

Want to become an expert ethical hacker and penetration tester? Request your free video training course of Online Penetration Testing and Ethical Hacking

Whether you're new to Linux or are a Linux guru, you can learn a lot more about the Linux kernel by requesting your free ebook of Linux Kernel In A Nutshell.


Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*