Linpus Linux 9.6 Installation Guide

Ok, all the applications have been installed, the system has rebooted, and the screenshot you see below is on your monitor. Go to the next window to continue the final steps of the installation process.
start phase2 installation

To use Linpux Linux 9.6, you must accept the License Agreement. This is the GNU General Public License (GPL), but whether Linpus is in full compliance with the terms of the GPL is another matter. In any case, you must accept to proceed.

The date should be set automatically by the installer. You should not need to change anything here, if you selected the correct time zone at the beginning of the installation. At this step, you have the option to enable Network Time Protocol (NTP), and we highly recommend that you do. Click on the Network Time Protocol tab.


Enabling NTP allows your PC to automatically sync its clock with a remote time server, or a pool of remote time servers, using the Network Time Protocol. Once enabled, the clock on your PC should be accurate to within 10 milliseconds (1/100 s). This is possible because using NTP, your PC obtains its time from other computers (time servers) directly or indirectly connect to a Stratum 0 device such as an Atomic clock.

Now it’s time to create a regular user. This is the user that you will use to login to the PC for day-to-day use. For security reasons, the password you set here should not be the same as the root (administrator) password you set earlier.

This is the final step, and here, the installer presents and configures the sound card(s) detected on the PC. Linpus Linux is good with hardware detection, and all you need to do here is test it.

That’s it, and I hope the explanations here have helped you – if you are new to the world of free and open source operating systems, to get a better understanding of the process involved in installing a Linux operating system.

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One Comment

  1. I also installed Linpus Linux 9.6 and write about it on http://linpus-linux-96.blogspot.com But from the time I writen this blog I’ve put in a 60GB hard drive and reinstall Linpus Linux 9.6 after which the computer told me that I only had 2.1 avalible hard disk space, the program self used about 7GB, what happed to the rest?

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