NetworkManager: Secret weapon for the Linux road warrior

NetworkManager is one of those “must-have” and “must-be-installed-by-default” applications that I like to see running on any Linux or BSD desktop distro. The nm-applet, NetworkManager’s client application, is a Gnome desktop tool, and it is installed by default on the latest Gnome desktops. Similar applets exist for the K Desktop Environment – KDE, but none is as feature-rich as Gnome’s nm-applet. Kyle Gonzales has written a detailed article about NetworkManager and nm-applet in Redhat Magazine.

Here’s part of the article:

For years I have envied how easy my Windows- and Mac-based peers had it when traveling with their laptops. They connect to hotspots with ease, get online while I was still logging into root and running some tools. It just wasn’t fair. I wanted an integrated easy-to-use tool that did not require bringing up a shell or logging into root.

I now have that tool in NetworkManager. In this article I will explain what NetworkManager is, what capabilities exist in the tool (in both Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux), and what you can do to extend it to give you more control over your system than before.

What is NetworkManager?

NetworkManager is a software utility that allows a desktop user to manage wired, wireless, modem, WWAN/3G, and VPN network connectivity from a single source. It does not require root access or manual editing of configuration files.

NetworkManager started as a Gnome project and initially appeared in Fedora. It is now supported on multiple desktop environments (Gnome, KDE, Xfce, etc.) and in multiple distributions (Fedora, SuSE, Ubuntu, Gentoo, Debian, etc.). NetworkManager uses dbus and hal to provide network status updates to other desktop applications, allowing them to alter their operation based on this information. For instance, if NetworkManager shows the network is offline, then apps like Evolution and Pidgin will put themselves into offline mode and wait for the network to come online.

How is the NetworkManager software deployed on the system?

You may read the rest here.

Related Posts

How to customize Linux Mint 14 Cinnamon The latest version of Cinnamon desktop that shipped with Linux Mint 14 Cinnamon offers users a stable and fun-to-use desktop environment built on mode...
LVM Configuration in Ubuntu 8.10 There are two desktop editions of Ubuntu, the popular Linux distribution. The one most people are used to is the Live CD version, the edition that all...
How to add and manage users in Pear Linux 5 Creating and managing user accounts in Pear Linux 5 or any other desktop Linux distribution is a very simple task. This article touches on the differe...
Manual disk partitioning guide for BackTrack 5 R2 GNOME BackTrack Linux is now known as Kali Linux. You may read all Kali Linux articles and tutorial at http://linuxbsdos.com/category/kali-linux. BackT...
Homerun: Quite possibly the best app launcher for your desktop Fullscreen application menus or launchers (or whatever else you what to call them) are modern replacements for the traditional or classic application ...
Installing NGINX and NGINX Plus With Ansible This article was originally published by Kevin Jones on the official Nginx website. Ansible is an open source tool for IT configuration management,...

We Recommend These Vendors

Launch an SSD VPS in Europe, USA, Asia & Australia on Vultr's KVM-based Cloud platform starting at $5:00/month (15 GB SSD, 768 MB of RAM).

Deploy an SSD Cloud server in 55 seconds on DigitalOcean. Built for developers and starting at $5:00/month (20 GB SSD, 512 MB of RAM).


Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*